Electrophysiology Techniques


Single-unit recording
Single Unit Recording is the use of an electrode to record the electrophysiological activity (action potentials) from a single neuron.
Patch Clamp Technique
Patch Clamp Technique is a laboratory technique in electrophysiology that allows the study of single or multiple ion channels in cells.


Single-unit recording

• Single Unit Recording is the use of an electrode to record the electrophysiological activity (action potentials) from a single neuron. The electrode introduced into the brain of a living animal will detect electrical activity that is generated by the neurons adjacent to the electrode tip. If the electrode is a microelectrode, with a tip size of 3 to 10 micrometers, the electrode will often isolate the activity of a single neuron.The activity consists of the voltages generated in the extra cellular matrix by the current fields outside the cell when it generates an action potential. Recording in this way is generally called “single-unit” recording. The recorded action potentials look very much like the action potentials that are recorded intracellularly, but the signals are very much smaller (typically about 0.1 mV).

Patch Clamp Technique

• Patch Clamp Technique is a laboratory technique in electrophysiology that allows the study of single or multiple ion channels in cells. This discovery made it possible to record the currents of single ion channels for the first time, proving their involvement in fundamental cell processes such as action potential conduction. Erwin Neher and Bert Sakmann developed the patch clamp in the late 1970s and early 1980s.They received the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine in 1991 for this work. Patch Clamp technique can be applied to a wide variety of cells, but is especially useful in the study of excitable cells such as neurons, cardiomyocytes, muscle fibers and pancreatic beta cells. It can also be applied to the study of bacterial ion channels in specially prepared giant spheroplasts.

D.Mohankumar

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